Transmission

Using the latest in state-of-the-art technology for your vehicle, we will install a safe and effective cleaner to suspend harmful varnish and sludge from the transmission valve body, torque converter and lines and install new high-tech fluid with conditioners.

Just like your engine, you should have your transmission on your import vehicle serviced regularly. When OKC Garage in Edmond, OK services your vehicle, we perform a:

Transmission Flush

  • Remove and inspect the pan
  • Clean or replace the screen
  • Clean the pan
  • Reinstall the pan
  • Install a new gasket
  • Replace old fluid with new, high quality fluid
  • Make any additional needed changes and adjustments

Import Vehicles require the same transmission care needed by domestic vehicles. By replacing the old transmission fluid in your vehicle, our expert team at OKC Garage essentially gives your vehicle’s transmission new life. The new fluid restores your clutch’s holding power. This reduces slip and heat production. Additionally, flushing the old fluid in the car gets rid of small bits of clutch material and metal shavings, which can damage your transmission by clogging passages and wedging themselves between moving parts. Getting rid of the old fluid reduces wear within the transmission and makes your car last longer.

Replacing old fluid with new also provides better lubrication, which boosts the holding ability of the friction components. Improved lubrication also results in less heat. By decreasing friction and heat, your transmission will work better for a longer amount of time. A simple service can save you the money and time that come with a major transmission repair or replacement. Visit OKC Garage in Edmond, OK for your next auto repair service.

Anatomy Of An Automatic Transmission

If you have ever driven a car with an automatic transmission, then you know that there are two big differences between an automatic transmission and a manual transmission:

    • There is no clutch pedal in an automatic transmission car.
    • There is no gear shift in an automatic transmission car. Once you put the transmission into drive, everything else is automatic.

Both the automatic transmission (plus its torque converter) and a manual transmission (with­ its clutch) accomplish exactly the same thing, but they do it in totally different ways. It turns out that the way an automatic transmission does it is absolutely amazing!

In this article, we’ll work our way through an automatic transmission. We’ll start with the key to the whole system: planetary gearsets. Then we’ll see how the transmission is put together, learn how the controls work and discuss some of the intricacies involved in controlling a transmission.

Anatomy Of A Manual Transmission

If you drive a stick-shift car, then you may have several questions floating in your head.

How does the funny “H” pattern that I am moving this shift knob through have any relation to the gears inside the transmission? What is moving inside the transmission when I move the shifter? When I mess up and hear that horrible grinding sound, what is actually grinding? What would happen if I were to accidentally shift into reverse while I am speeding down the freeway? Would the entire transmission explode?

Cars need transmissions because of the physics of the gasoline engine. First, any engine has a redline — a maximum rpm value above which the engine cannot go without exploding. Second, if you have read How Horsepower Works, then you know that engines have narrow rpm ranges where horsepower and torque are at their maximum. For example, an engine might produce its maximum horsepower at 5,500 rpm. The transmission allows the gear ratio between the engine and the drive wheels to change as the car speeds up and slows down. You shift gears so the engine can stay below the redline and near the rpm band of its best performance.

Ideally, the transmission would be so flexible in its ratios that the engine could always run at its single, best-performance rpm value. That is the idea behind the continuously variable transmission (CVT).